50 Printable Baby Feeding Charts [Newborn Feeding Schedule]

When it’s time to start introducing new foods to your little one, this can be a very confusing and exciting time. Whether you’re a first-time parent or not, creating a baby feeding chart is very beneficial. Having a baby feeding schedule provides you with a guide for you to know how much and what to feed your little one from the beginning.

Baby Feeding Charts










Setting your baby’s feeding routine using a baby feeding chart 

Before you start implementing your baby feeding chart, you may want to create a feeding routine for your little one first. Babies and children must focus when it’s time to eat so you need to make sure that your little one is both ready and comfortable.

Start by washing your baby’s hands, soothing him, and sitting him down on his feeding chair to start eating. Throughout the process, try to remain calm. Also, avoid using electronic devices or playing loud music when it’s mealtime. This helps your baby become aware of the process.

When you’re introducing new types of food to your baby, be very patient. It may take some time for your little one to feel comfortable with all of the new sensations that come with eating – the textures and tastes of the new food items, the feel of the spoon in your baby’s mouth, and more.

Expect to get a lot of different facial expressions from your little one at this time. If you see any standout preferences or any foods which make your baby grimace, you may jot these down on the baby feeding log you create. This makes it an excellent reference aside from being just a chart or schedule.

Newborn Feeding Schedules












Readiness signs to include in your baby feeding chart by age 

As you create your newborn feeding schedule or baby feeding chart, you may also want to include the signs of readiness to guide you as you feed your little one. This can be especially helpful for first-time parents. Here are the readiness signs to include in your baby feeding schedule according to their age:

Birth – 4 months

 

  • The baby displays a “rooting reflex,” where he turns his head inward in search of your nipple.

 

4 months – 6 months, 6 months – 8 months 

  • The baby holds his head up independently.
  • The baby sits up when placed in a highchair.
  • The baby mimics chewing with his mouth.
  • The birth weight of the baby has doubled.
  • The baby shows curiosity about what others eat.
  • The baby closes his lips when you place a spoon on his tongue.
  • The baby holds food inside his mouth rather than pushing it out.
  • The baby consumes up to 40 oz each day and is still hungry.

 

8 months – 10 months 

  • Same as above.
  • The baby picks up small objects using his thumb and forefinger.
  • The baby transfers toys or objects between both of his hands.
  • The baby starts putting toys and other objects into his mouth.
  • The baby mimics chewing.

 

10 months – 1 year 

  • Same as above.
  • The baby swallows food without choking or gagging.
  • More teeth start growing in the baby’s mouth.
  • The baby grabs the spoon and tries to feed himself.

 

1 year – 2 years 

  • Same as above.
  • The child can use a spoon to feed himself.

 

2 years – 3 years 

  • Same as above.
  • The child gets better at feeding himself with a spoon.
  • The child starts making his own food choices.

Baby Feeding Log










Making your baby feeding chart 

Now that you know the readiness indicators to look out for and include in your newborn feeding schedule or baby feeding log, you can start making your template. You can either download a baby feeding chart template or create your own. For the information, make sure to include the following:

Birth – 4 months 

  • The only foods to introduce at this age is either breast or formula milk.
  • For breastfed newborns, feed them on demand. For formula-fed newborns, feed them every couple of hours.

 

4 months – 6 months 

  • Foods to introduce include breast or formula milk mixed with pureed peaches, bananas, applesauce, sweet potatoes, squash, rice cereal fortified with iron, and more.
  • When introducing new foods to babies at this age, you can do so in any order. You can start by giving strained fruits or veggies or with baby cereal. When your little one reaches 6 months, you may even start feeding him tofu.
  • The amount of feeding to include on your baby feeding log for this age is around a teaspoon of pureed fruits or cereal mixed with up to 5 teaspoons of breast or formula milk. As time goes by, you can increase the amount one teaspoon at a time.

 

6 months – 8 months 

  • Foods to introduce include breast or formula mixed with other types of pureed fruits and veggies. You can also start with mashed tofu, mashed avocado, strained lean meats, non-dairy yogurt, and mashed beans.
  • For the amount of feeding, start with a teaspoon of pureed fruits or veggies then work up to a quarter or half-cup which you split into 3 separate feedings. For cereal, start with about 3 tablespoons then work up to 9 tablespoons which you split into 3 separate feedings.

 

8 months – 10 months 

  • Foods to introduce include soft types of cheeses, mashed fruits, mashed veggies, mashed proteins, mashed beans, and flaked soft fish. You may also start giving finger foods to your baby. Just make sure that they’re well-cooked and cut up to avoid choking.
  • For the amount of feeding, you can give a quarter to a half-cup of cereal, fruit or vegetables each day. You can also give an eighth to a quarter-cup of protein foods each day. For dairy foods, you may give about half an ounce for cheeses and a quarter to a third cup of milk products.

 

10 months – 1 year 

  • Foods to introduce include soft pasteurized cheeses, cut-up or cubed fruits, well-cooked cut-up or cubed veggies, pasta, mashed protein foods, and finger foods.
  • When introducing new foods to babies at this age,
  • For the amount of feeding, you can give half an ounce of cheese and a third-cup of other types of dairy products. You can give a quarter to a half-cup of fruits, veggies or cereal. You can also give an eighth to a quarter-cup of proteins or combination foods.

 

1 year – 2 years 

  • Foods to introduce include whole milk and other types of dairy products. Table foods mean the foods that the rest of the family eats which you cut into bite-sized pieces. Other types of grains, vegetables, and fruits. Non-citrus and citrus juices, and honey after you get a go-signal from your child’s pediatrician.
  • For the amount of feeding, you can give 2 cups of dairy, a cup of fruits, a cup of veggies, 2 ounces of protein, and 3 ounces of grains.

 

2 years – 3 years 

  • Foods to introduce include low-fat cow’s milk after getting the go-signal from your little one’s pediatrician, table foods which you slice or cut-up into small pieces, dried fruits, vegetable, and fruit juices.
  • For the amount of feeding, you can give 2 cups of milk, 1 1/2 ounces of cheeses, 5 ounces of grains, 1 1/2 cups of fruit, 1 1/2 cups of veggies, and up to 4 ounces of proteins.

Baby Feeding Schedules










Tips for creating your baby feeding chart

When it comes to babies, their world revolves around sleeping, changing, and feeding. This is a daily pattern which starts from when your child comes into the world until the first few years of his life.

If you want to make the most out of your baby’s feeding routine, you may want to create a baby feeding schedule. Here are some tips to help you out:

Start at the appropriate time

Especially for first-time parents, you should always start creating a schedule and introducing the different foods at the right time. This is why it’s important to include the readiness signs and other feeding tips in your baby feeding chart. This information guides you as you feed your growing baby.

Find your feeding rhythm

From the start, you should create a feeding routine for your little one. This makes it easier for him to learn how to eat when the right time comes. After creating your baby’s feeding schedule, stick to it. The more you follow the schedule, the more you and your little one will find your feeding rhythm.

Once you find your feeding rhythm, your child learns what to do when it’s feeding time. He learns how to focus on the task and after some time, he will also learn how to tell you when he’s full or when he’s still hungry because that’s what he feels.

Watch out for your baby’s cues

From the start, you must learn to watch out for your baby’s cues. Although there are the common cues babies and children may display when it comes to eating, your child may have his own indicators which you must learn. That way, you can verbalize his cues to help him learn how to communicate too.